Apparently, something happened today.

Edited 5th June 2015

26 years ago, something may or may not have happened, depending on where you were  – or are today. This is reason enough for those able to acknowledge the Tiananmen Square massacre to do so, and remain mindful of the yet formally undisclosed sacrifices made for basic civic rights. Reason enough to demand these rights are upheld, and the memories of those who perished are honoured, or at the very least, that they are one day recognized. Reason enough for those that live in a de-facto region of China who are reminded with increasing frequency to not bite the hand that feeds it, to uphold the tradition of remembrance as this young nation continues to write its own story.

Coverage of the anniversary falls in the murky waters that stem from media bias but also reader bias, from the perspective of a city of 7 million with alliances that have splintered further since the Occupy protests in 2014. Official turnout figures and those of The Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China as usual vary, this year by a margin of 88,000. However, both counts agree that this years turnout was less than last year. Could this be in part to a local movement that appealed for the focus for Hong Kong’s fight for democracy to be about Hong Kong? Arguments ranging from ‘Leave China matters to China’ to ‘What will this accomplish anyway?’

Another argument is that the vigil has turned into slactivism, or that people use it to further their own agendas. Perhaps. But consider how this all contributes to a much larger story – whatever the motivation. One that deserves the attention it gets given today’s media infrastructure – for a variety of reasons; recognition for the right to demonstrate in Hong Kong, solidarity for its own fight for genuine democracy, or simply because we are still allowed to remember, for those who cannot. The one thing that must be agreed on is, given the alternative, we must never stop trying.

From The Economist circa 10th June 1989:

20140607_blp507

“Faced with a choice between more reform and a small loosening of the party’s grip on power, Mr Deng chose to strangle reform. He could do so because China’s Communist party is still at the mercy of its leaders’ whims and fat beyond the people’s power to control. It may be premature to hope that the remarkable acts of bravery shown by Beijing’s citizens this week will soon be translated into genuine democracy. But China’s people will not stop trying.”

On a similar vein, you have four, (now three) days left to back Hong Kong Free Press: A new, non-profit, independent English language news source for Hong Kong

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